Disaster Recovery Sites

DR sites ensure that operations can continue regardless of any mishap or disaster. They can also function as a means of replicating data from the main site to ensure minimal data loss

Disaster Recovery have become an integral part of the ongoing business process with most of the Organizations that consider it important to do risk assessment and risk mitigation to safeguard their business from all sorts of threats and crises.

A Disaster Recovery (DR) site is a physical location separate from a company’s primary headquarters. Its purpose is to keep the organizational systems running in the event of a power outage, cyberattack, network failure, natural disaster, unexpected downtime, sabotage or other event that takes down the primary location.

Depending on the type of DR site, and what DR services they’re using, the facility might be online immediately, or there might be a short or long delay. As well discuss below, the type of DR site selected depends on the needs and financial resources of the organization.

What is the Importance of a Disaster Recovery Site?

DR sites ensure that operations can continue regardless of any mishap or disaster. They can also function as a means of replicating data from the main site to ensure minimal data loss. A DR site greatly reduces risk to the organization and eliminates the possibility of a devastating data loss incident or a period of downtime that could cripple the organization.

Commercial Disaster Recovery Sites

It is not uncommon in case of IT companies to seek services of a third party vendor who specializes in providing DR services. In most cases where the IT installations are huge and critical, using a good third party DR center makes more sense than setting up one in house. When it comes to Third party services, following options are available in the market.

  •  Hot Site: A hot site refers to a ready to use office or site or a ‘Plug and Play’ facility that is fully equipped and fully functional. In case of hot sites, all systems can be pre – loaded and kept ready for use including communication network etc within one hour or so. The cost of such hot site could be the same as the running costs of established operations or even more.
  • Cold Site: A shell space with basic facilities is called a cold site. One would need to move in, set up the computer networks and get the systems set up going including communication network etc. Cold site basically refers to a semi furnished space with basic infrastructure in place. The cost could be relatively cheaper as it does not include the infrastructure. In case of an emergency, the teams can move in with the infrastructure and set up the office or business within a day or two.
  • Mobile or Portable Sites: Some vendors offer work spaces that are mobile and mounted on trailers. Some offer portable prefab cabins which can be stationed anywhere. Such mobile sites would be shell spaces and would need to be equipped with infrastructure to start operations.